History of Surveillance Cameras

The History of Surveillance Cameras

BY THOMAS CARNEVALE ON APR 25, 2017

Video Surveillance has come a long way in just the past 100 years. The technology we are so used to having now was nothing more than a wild idea many years ago. So many huge improvements have been made for video surveillance, not just hardware but design-wise also. We are at the point where even our tiny, handheld phones have enough power to record a short session of video, and in high quality too.

Let’s take a quick look at the history, development, and events of video surveillance cameras over the many years...

1880

The first movie cameras were just starting to be developed. Fast-forward 13 years. William Dickson and Thomas Edison publicly demonstrated one of the first motion pictures to a large audience. In just a few more years during that time, commercial motion pictures were being produced and shown all across America. This was the beginning of what was to become the video surveillance technology that we have today.

1942

German scientists developed and installed the first CCTV (Closed-Circuit Television) in order to observe the launch of their V-2 rockets. In later years, CCTV was also used by the United States while testing devastating atomic bombs.

1949

The first commercial CCTV system became available. Its name was Vericon, however very little is known about it besides the fact that it did not require a government permit to use, something that is unheard of today.

1968

Olean, New York became the first city in the United States to install video cameras on its busy main street which held many large businesses. The streets they installed on had a growing problem with random acts of crime and violence. Their sole intention of installing the cameras was to fight that crime and keep the businesses a safe place to go to.

1973

Times Square in New York City installed several surveillance cameras to help deter the heavy amount of crime that had been happening in the area. Shortly after the cameras had been installed, crime rates gradually began to decrease.

1986

Times Square in New York City installed several surveillance cameras to help deter the heavy amount of crime that had been happening in the area. Shortly after the cameras had been installed, crime rates gradually began to decrease.

1990

ATMs now have cameras installed on them to record all financial transactions.

1996

The first IP camera is released. This marked the beginning of the decline of CCTV and opened the pathway to computer networked cameras. Efficiency using computers begin to skyrocket and become much more affordable.

2001

The World Trade Center is attacked twice by terrorists. As a response, more and more people begin to realize security surveillance is immensely important. They also begin to implement surveillance cameras into their businesses and homes. Cameras are installed on the streets, at ATMs, and even in transportation vehicles.

Present 2017

These are just a handful of events that have made video surveillance the powerful technology that it is today. Starting in the early 2000s, video surveillance has become and more common. It has been used primarily for businesses to protect their places of work and, in more recent years, to prevent violent terrorist attacks from taking place. With proper video surveillance in place, any location can become safer and have less negative or violent events take place. Now with proper coverage and high-quality evidence, no one can get away with random acts of crimes and violence. Because of video surveillance, thousands of criminals are caught every year and that number will continue to rise. It is our mission to make the world a safer and more secure place for everyone. Everyone deserves that peace of mind. Thanks to the many great inventors in the past 100 years, this is now a very real possibility. We hope that in the years to come, video surveillance technology will continue to evolve, become more sophisticated and useful, and aid in creating a safe environment wherever they are used.